What does the Bo Xilai scandal tell us about China’s political system?

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May 10, 2012 - 10:17 -

A little more than a year ago, I offered an analysis on this blog of the likelihood that the color revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa would trigger a similar movement in China (http://infocus.asiaportal.info/2011/03/02/blogsin-focus2011marchare-flower-revolutions-middle-east-and-north-africa-endangering-stability/). One year later, the

Well-deserved boomerang hits Malaysia by Anya Palm

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September 7, 2009 - 09:42 -

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Vikings vs the new economic superpower: the Tibet issue in Sino-Danish relations by Clemens Stubbe Østergaard, Aarhus Univ.

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December 14, 2009 - 04:47 -

Danes love to have their cake and eat it. Or as the
Danish expression goes: to blow air and yet keep flour in your mouth. In the
past, before globalization, we could say one thing at home, and do something
else abroad. Or we could rely on being so insignificant that others did not
bother to react to contradictory policies on our part. Being a small country,
though, has never prevented us from imagining ourselves a great power – perhaps
remembering Viking times. A number of times we accordingly collided with