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April 2021

Japan Lecture Series: Sanpo Yoshi

April 21, 2021 - 10:00-11:30
Zoom

Sanpo Yoshi is an old Japanese business model with origins in the 17th century. Sanpo means “three directions,” and Yoshi means “good,” and the term is frequently used by Japanese businesses even today. It originated from traveling salespeople who realized the importance of honesty and long-term trust for successful business relationships. Should a business outcome be positive for both buyer and seller and society as a whole, business prospects will inevitably grow. The concept can be understood as a win-win-win model, “good in three directions.” In this webinar, the speakers will…

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Claiming Labor Rights “A ‘new era’ for migrant labor unrest in China? Changing patterns of worker protests under Xi Jinping”

April 21, 2021 - 12:00-13:30
Zoom

Digital Guest Lecture by  Daniel Fuchs, Humboldt University. Welcome to the last lecture in the "Current affairs in China" series this spring semester: A ‘new era’ for migrant labor unrest in China? Changing patterns of worker protests under Xi Jinping. Photo: Marc-Olivier Jodoin / Unsplash Over the last decade, the patterns of worker protests in China have changed significantly. Struggles for workers’ rights provided grounds for optimism regarding the collective empowerment of China’s working class. However, Xi Jinping’s ascendance to power…

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Guest Lecture: “The god of wealth in Chinese ritual mythology and Mongolian conspiracy theories”

April 22, 2021 - 11:00-13:00
Zoom

Date: Thursday, 22 April 2021 Time: 11.00-13.00 CET In this guest lecture I look at the case of the reinterpretation of the Chinese rituals of veneration to the ‘god of wealth’ (財神) in contemporary Mongolian culture. I shall introduce the figure(s) of the god of wealth, and its specific features and functions in the ritual mythology and everyday practices of Chinese communities. I shall also regard these features in the broader context of Chinese and Mongolian folk beliefs about the…

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At the Critical Moment: The Rhizome and “Democracy to Come”

April 22, 2021 - 13:30-15:00
online

The University of Nottingham's Taiwan Studies Programme presents an online discussion, At the Critical Moment: The Rhizome and “Democracy to Come” by Dr Shih-wei Hsu, Assistant Professor in Organisational Behaviour, Nottingham University Business School China. Talk abstract There has been strong interest in the use of the metaphor of rhizomes as developed by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. The rhizome at its birth was an epistemological concept but, with the advancement of internet and social media, it has gradually gained an ontological…

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Roundtable: Academic Freedom in India

April 26, 2021 - 17:00-18:00
Zoom

The Norwegian Centre for Human Rights Master's students, with Scholars at Risk, invite you to a roundtable discussion exploring the social, political and legal context of academic freedom in India. With a special focus on Professor G N Saibaba's case, our panel of four experts will discuss issues related to the Indian government's unprecedented assault on academic freedom and academics. Register here.  Panelists (to be confirmed): Indira Jaising, Senior Advocate, Supreme Court of India Tarunabh Khaitan, Vice-Dean, Faculty of Law…

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Apertures #2: Paola Voci & Yiyi Yin – Chinese screen cultures, digital video platforms and algorithmic fandom

April 28, 2021 - 10:00-11:00
Zoom

The Machine Vision in Everyday Life research project welcomes Prof. Paola Voci and Dr. Yiyi Yin to discuss Chinese screen cultures, digital video platforms and algorithmic fandom. For more than two decades, digital media have played a central role in mediating encounters between Chinese users and audiovisual content. From early video-sharing websites and social media platforms to short video apps and livestreaming services, the personal screens of portable devices are a window into a multitude of vernacular practices and creative…

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Meet the Author: The Burmese Labyrinth – A History of the Rohingya Tragedy

April 28, 2021 - 14:00-15:30
Zoom

In 2011, Myanmar embarked in a democratic transition from a brutal military rule that culminated four years later, when the first free election in decades saw a landslide for the party of celebrated Nobel Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi. Yet, even as the international community was celebrating a new dawn, old wars were raging in the northern borderlands. A crisis was emerging in western Arakan state where the regime intensified its oppression of the vulnerable Muslim Rohingya community. By 2017,…

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Book Talk – Political Violence in Southeast Asia since 1945: Cases from Six Countries.

April 28, 2021 - 15:30-16:30
Zoom

Eve Zucker and Ben Kiernan introduce their new book, Political Violence in Southeast Asia since 1945: Cases from Six Countries Date: Wednesday 28 April 2021 Time: 15.30-16.30 CET / 9:30-10:30am EST Hosted by NIAS and NYSEAN This anthology of 17 chapters examines waves of political violence that impacted six Southeast Asian countries – Indonesia, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam – from the wars of independence in the mid-twentieth century to America's Indochina Wars to the recent Rohingya genocide. Despite…

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Eva Liias: Olympic Games in Higher Education – Japanese Responses to Internationalization of Universities

April 29, 2021 - 11:00-13:00
Zoom

Date: Thursday, 29 April 2021 Time: 11:00-13.00 (CET)/12:00-14:00 (Helsinki, EET) During the last two decades university rankings dominate in media headlines, they have an impact on how students choose their universities, and they even shape developments at universities. International rankings, sometimes also referred to as the Olympic games in higher education (HE), are a driver for universities (and governments) to question their reputation, standards, and quality. Japanese universities, being argued of having Western roots in their institutions, are well-known in…

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Pandemic precarity: Covid-19, migrant workers, and state-labour relations in East and Southeast Asia

April 29, 2021 - 12:00-13:15
Zoom

Creating jobs and providing decent employment is central to global development agendas. Indeed, Sustainable Development Goal 8 targets nothing less than decent work for all by 2030. Yet the precarisation of work is a defining feature of late capitalism, driven by the search for profit and economic growth and enabled by political regimes and the disorganisation of labour. Large parts of the global precariat reside in Asia, where their labour play a crucial role in regional and global production networks.…

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